Know the Basic Rules of Bridge

Millions of people all over the world enjoy playing card games. One of the favourites is the popular multiplayer game of Contract Bridge. This is a trick-taking game for four players, played in teams of two. The rules can appear to be complex, and the game allows a lot of room for strategy, which is one of the reasons it is so widely enjoyed. However, all you need to start playing is a few basic rules – the more you play the more complexities you’ll be able to add to your game.

Know the Basic Rules of Bridge

As you prepare to play your first game of Contact Bridge here are some of the basic rules you’ll need to know:

 

Know the Basic Rules of Bridge

Four Phases:

  1. Dealing the cards – the first to deal is the player who draws the high card prior to dealing and play proper. The four players play in two teams and playing partners sit opposite each other. Before dealing, cards are properly shuffled. Dealing follows in a clockwise direction, starting from the left of the dealer. After dealing, each player takes hold of 13 cards.
  2. Bidding – also known as auction. It refers to a call done by the player to win a particular number. Each bid should be higher than the preceding bid. In bridge, you’re lucky if you win as many tricks as possible.
  3. Playing the hand – consider the value of your hand before bidding. If your hand is worth 12 points, it’s good to pass. For hands over 13 points, bid with your highest suit. To begin playing, the defender on the declarer’s left places his selection face up on the table. Others require placing the cards face down on the table to enable to ask questions about the auction, then face it up if there are no further questions. The hands play clockwise and each hand must “follow suit”. The play is considered finished if all thirteen tricks are played. The declarer can assert the rest of the tricks by showing his hand and state his bid about those.
  4. Scoring the results – The first team to score 100 for successful contracts is the winner. There are equivalents for each suit. For example, if trumps are hearts or spades, that would be equivalent to 30 points per trick.

Learning the basics of the game isn’t enough to win. However, frequent practice will gradually make you a master in this game.